Ever Dance With The Devil In The Pale Moon Light?

Batman, seafood, life.
Nuff said.
NSFW

July 29, 2014 11:03 pm 10:51 pm
no-more-ramen:

lutra-canadensis:

Just made Black Bean Brownies with this recipie from No-More-Ramen! They’re so delicious, I can’t even tell there are black beans or BALSAMIC VINEGAR in these babies. Oof. 

they look awesome!!! sprinkles are always a good idea

no-more-ramen I can’t seen to find this recipe and the lentil rice and bean one. I’m a chef of 20 yeses and love your simple recipes because I use my own takes on them and they’re delicious.

no-more-ramen:

lutra-canadensis:

Just made Black Bean Brownies with this recipie from No-More-Ramen! They’re so delicious, I can’t even tell there are black beans or BALSAMIC VINEGAR in these babies. Oof. 

they look awesome!!! sprinkles are always a good idea

no-more-ramen I can’t seen to find this recipe and the lentil rice and bean one. I’m a chef of 20 yeses and love your simple recipes because I use my own takes on them and they’re delicious.
10:47 pm

askerquestioner

Anonymous: My parents want me to start paying rent (I just turned 18) and they say it's to try to help cover a little bit of the costs of my food (they act like me and my sister lay around and gorge on food all day) but I really don't even eat too much since I'm not hungry often and I maintain my weight anyways, and I'm sorry this is so jumbled but I was wondering if you think one person can live off of 300$ worth of food per month bc I'd rather buy my own food than just hand the money to them

no-more-ramen:

secretandroid:

no-more-ramen:

i think family disagreements are always delicate, but i’ll do my best to advise you, anon. i myself have dealt with a lot of family issues pertaining to money and trust, so i really feel you on this. what’s hard about answering you is that i don’t know the full picture of your family situation, or your parents’ intention. my thoughts are coming purely off of what you’re written to me here, and based on my own experience. i am not dictating what other people should do — just giving you my opinion based on what i’ve experienced.

$300/month for food is really a lot, to be frank. my boyfriend and i usually go on one big grocery trip a month and spend around $150, tops. i mean, we do budget and make sure to go to places like aldi where we know we’re getting good prices, but we don’t spend anywhere near that. you’re just one person, and, regardless of how much you need to eat to sustain yourself and be healthy, that’s really, really overshooting your projected costs. 

on the other hand, if rent is meant to cover housing, food, internet, utilities, etc (all inclusive, basically), that sounds like a more reasonable conversation you could negotiate. from your ask, though, it sounds like your parents explicitly said this will go towards food. 

financially, it makes way more sense to purchase your own food in this scenario. you are going to spend way less than $300/month for yourself, especially if you are smart with your money, look for good deals, and don’t purchase more than you will use. the foreseeable downside to this is tension with your family. there’s a lot of potential for arguments over, “whose is this?” / “do we share staples?” / “you ate my _____!”. how are you going to have family dinners? do you use some of their food and some of yours? will all your meals be separate? maybe that sounds extreme, but i know it would come to that with my parents. 

i wish you luck! i apologize if i gave you more of my opinion than you wanted. money is always a tough disagreement with loved ones.

ok so i wrote a response while you were editing the post but i still think it’s important to point out, since yr blog is supposed to be about accessibility, that $300/month is not necessarily ridiculous/overshooting/
"not smart with your money”, because:

-the price of food is extremely location-specific

-if you have dietary restrictions, allergies or other special needs you’re gonna spend more on food

-for those who have trouble cooking, saving in spoons generally means spending more money, eg. premade meals are very expensive, buying a jar of minced garlic costs more than a bulb of garlic, buying veg stock costs more than making your own, gluten free/vegan stuff tends to be really expensive, etc.

-personally i can’t grocery shop often so i splurge on produce from expensive places like whole foods because it’s higher grade (in other words, when i get it at discount marts it’s rotting on the shelf or super freezer burned)

-being able to shop around for the best deals is a luxury in time/accessibility/energy that not everyone has

just off the top of my head.

i wish i could spend 150/month on food for myself. even when i could cook everything from scratch i can’t remember ever spending that little on groceries. i think EBT gives a bigger food allowance than that per person.

i edited it to clarify further that the answer was based off of my own experience, and not a universal one. i completely, absolutely agree with all your factors, and that’s why it’s impossible to come up with a budget in dollars that should work for everyone. 

i don’t know how else i can state it. i was answering that based on my own life. like i said in a separate note, i live in a smaller town in the midwest where food prices are relatively low. i wasn’t counting in my answer the food my boyfriend and i spend on going out to eat, or that there is a community garden less than a mile from us that provides us with tons of fresh produce for free. i wasn’t including the smaller grocery trips we take a couple of times a month, just the ONE BIG grocery trip we do for staples.

10:45 pm

amroyounes:

8 vegetables that you can regrow again and again.

Scallions

You can regrow scallions by leaving an inch attached to the roots and place them in a small glass with a little water in a well-lit room.

Garlic

When garlic begins to sprout, you can put them in a glass with a little water and grow garlic sprouts. The sprouts have a mild flavor than garlic and can be added to salads, pasta and other dishes.

Bok Choy

Bok choy can be regrown by placing the root end in water in a well-lit area. In 1-2 weeks , you can transplant it to a pot with soil and grow a full new head.

Carrots

Put carrot tops in a dish with a little water. Set the dish in a well-lit room or a window sill.  You’ll have carrot tops to use in salads. 

Basil

Put clippings from basil with 3 to 4-inch stems in a glass of water and place it in direct sunlight. When the roots are about 2 inches long, plant them in pots to and in time it will grow a full basil plant.

Celery

Cut off the base of the celery and place it in a saucer or shallow bowl of warm water in the sun. Leaves will begin to thicken and grow in the middle of the base, then transfer the celery to soil. 

Romaine Lettuce

Put romaine lettuce stumps in a 1/2 inch of water. Re-water to keep water level at 1/2 inch. After a few days, roots and new leaves will appear and you can transplant it into soil.

Cilantro

The stems of cilantro will grown when placed in a glass of water. Once the roots are long enough, plant them in a pot in a well-lit room. You will have a full plant in a few months.

I do this

(via no-more-ramen)

10:44 pm
http://no-more-ramen.tumblr.com/post/93073098836/smothered-cabbage-three-delicious-variations

no-more-ramen:

Smothered Cabbage + Three Delicious Variations

This March, I discovered this Smothered Cabbage recipe on Food52 and it’s not just good, but really really good. Like, I’m kinda dreaming about the next time I’m going to make it good.

What? Delicious cabbage?! Yes! Delicious cabbage! Cabbage…

10:35 pm

The moment you realize your best friend didn’t know about your relationship with your family and asks and you try and be strong but the moment he leaves you cry because as many times as you tried trying to talk to your family they just don’t want you…

I’m ok but sometimes you just have to cry.

July 28, 2014 10:23 pm
That’s my baby lol

That’s my baby lol

10:12 pm
no-more-ramen:

GUEST BLOGGER COLUMN, “SHOESTRING SOUP”: KITCHEN BASICS
Whether you’re starting university, moving out of your parents’ home or just want to start cooking for yourself, you’ll probably need to learn the basics. There’s nothing to worry about — everyone has to start at the very beginning! Before you know it, you’ll be running a sleek kitchen operation on a tight budget.This article will cover your basic kitchen set up. These are the things you ideally need if you’re going to have some variety in your food. I’ll try and indicate what I think are the most important items, but use your own judgement. Ask yourself what sort of food you want to be cooking and will this item help you cook it? Will this utensil save you time and energy, and is that efficiency worth the money? Hopefully, you have access to an oven. This is your base unit. But, in order to use that, you’ll need some equipment.Pans
Pans are fairly ubiquitous items in the kitchen. If you’re just starting out with cooking, I would suggest two pans: a wok and a large saucepan. This will cover you for most basic meals. As you get more confident, or get better with budgeting, you can always think about buying more pans, such as a skillet/frying pan or a milk pan if you get particularly adventurous! The wok you will use for frying and for preparing things such as pasta sauce. The large saucepan can be used to boil water for rice and pasta or for preparing soups and stews.
Ovenware
If you’re thinking of making meals using the oven, you’re going to need a few things. Firstly, oven gloves/mitts! I cannot stress how important this is — please look after your fingers. Make sure they gloves are thick enough. Be sure to try them on and see if you can still move your hand. I prefer cloth ones as I find the silicone ones make it hard for me to move my wrists. You’re also going to need a baking sheet. Be sure to check the size so that it fits inside your oven. I would recommend getting one of the round ones as you’ll also be able to use it for cooking pizza (and everyone loves pizza). You may need two depending on how much stuff you want to make (e.g. pizza and oven fries). Lastly, get yourself a casserole dish. This is especially good if you are looking to cook low spoon meals. A casserole can be as easy as opening a few cans and then just popping it all in the oven!Utensils
Knives. There’s nothing more important in food preparation than a good knife. What you should do is go down to your store and pick a few up. Think of it like visiting Ollivander’s… You want a knife with a good balance and that is a good weight for you. There is no point having a huge knife if it’s going to wear you out after a few chops. If you’re looking to save time and energy, taking a few minutes to learn a good cutting technique with a quality, sharp knife will pay off massively in the long run. On that note, try and buy a knife sharpener. A dull blade is going to make it so difficult and you increase the risk of hurting yourself. You also want a serrated knife, for cutting things such as tomatoes (the serrated edge will cut much more easily through the skin). If you’re on a budget, though, a decent chef’s knife will do most jobs adequately. You will also need a minimum of one wooden spoon and a plastic spatula. I specify these materials because you don’t want to damage the coating of your pans. Once you get better at cooking, you can think about purchasing metal utensils, as you’ll be less likely to scrape the sides. A cheese grater can also be very handy, as would a whisk and a ladle. Lastly, a pair of chef’s scissors. These little things are very handy to have around, doing everything from cutting up chicken to slicing up pizza. Utensils is probably the area with the most room to wild in if you can afford it: pizza cutters, nutmeg grater, tongs – the list goes on. If you really want to treat yourself, I would suggest a hand blender with several different attachments. It is incredibly useful for when you want to get certain jobs done quicker. 
With all the things I’ve mentioned, don’t be afraid of looking for used items. Provided that they are clean (and in the case of electronics, have a valid safety check), there’s nothing wrong with going second-hand. I got a waffle iron for $5 from a charity store. That was 3 years ago and I’m still enjoying tasty waffles today!I hope you enjoyed this and hopefully learned something new. Look out for my next article where I will discuss shopping on a budget.
Cameron, 22, just finished his BA in English Language and Literature at King’s College London. He is a poet, part of the Barbican Young Poets and Burn After Reading collective, as well as an academic mentor. You can read all of Cameron’s posts here. 

Good post. Really well thought it.

no-more-ramen:

GUEST BLOGGER COLUMN, “SHOESTRING SOUP”: KITCHEN BASICS

Whether you’re starting university, moving out of your parents’ home or just want to start cooking for yourself, you’ll probably need to learn the basics. There’s nothing to worry about — everyone has to start at the very beginning! Before you know it, you’ll be running a sleek kitchen operation on a tight budget.

This article will cover your basic kitchen set up. These are the things you ideally need if you’re going to have some variety in your food. I’ll try and indicate what I think are the most important items, but use your own judgement. Ask yourself what sort of food you want to be cooking and will this item help you cook it? Will this utensil save you time and energy, and is that efficiency worth the money? Hopefully, you have access to an oven. This is your base unit. But, in order to use that, you’ll need some equipment.

Pans

Pans are fairly ubiquitous items in the kitchen. If you’re just starting out with cooking, I would suggest two pans: a wok and a large saucepan. This will cover you for most basic meals. As you get more confident, or get better with budgeting, you can always think about buying more pans, such as a skillet/frying pan or a milk pan if you get particularly adventurous! The wok you will use for frying and for preparing things such as pasta sauce. The large saucepan can be used to boil water for rice and pasta or for preparing soups and stews.

Ovenware

If you’re thinking of making meals using the oven, you’re going to need a few things. Firstly, oven gloves/mitts! I cannot stress how important this is — please look after your fingers. Make sure they gloves are thick enough. Be sure to try them on and see if you can still move your hand. I prefer cloth ones as I find the silicone ones make it hard for me to move my wrists. You’re also going to need a baking sheet. Be sure to check the size so that it fits inside your oven. I would recommend getting one of the round ones as you’ll also be able to use it for cooking pizza (and everyone loves pizza). You may need two depending on how much stuff you want to make (e.g. pizza and oven fries). Lastly, get yourself a casserole dish. This is especially good if you are looking to cook low spoon meals. A casserole can be as easy as opening a few cans and then just popping it all in the oven!

Utensils

Knives. There’s nothing more important in food preparation than a good knife. What you should do is go down to your store and pick a few up. Think of it like visiting Ollivander’s… You want a knife with a good balance and that is a good weight for you. There is no point having a huge knife if it’s going to wear you out after a few chops. If you’re looking to save time and energy, taking a few minutes to learn a good cutting technique with a quality, sharp knife will pay off massively in the long run. On that note, try and buy a knife sharpener. A dull blade is going to make it so difficult and you increase the risk of hurting yourself. You also want a serrated knife, for cutting things such as tomatoes (the serrated edge will cut much more easily through the skin). If you’re on a budget, though, a decent chef’s knife will do most jobs adequately. You will also need a minimum of one wooden spoon and a plastic spatula. I specify these materials because you don’t want to damage the coating of your pans. Once you get better at cooking, you can think about purchasing metal utensils, as you’ll be less likely to scrape the sides. A cheese grater can also be very handy, as would a whisk and a ladle. Lastly, a pair of chef’s scissors. These little things are very handy to have around, doing everything from cutting up chicken to slicing up pizza. 

Utensils is probably the area with the most room to wild in if you can afford it: pizza cutters, nutmeg grater, tongs – the list goes on. If you really want to treat yourself, I would suggest a hand blender with several different attachments. It is incredibly useful for when you want to get certain jobs done quicker.

With all the things I’ve mentioned, don’t be afraid of looking for used items. Provided that they are clean (and in the case of electronics, have a valid safety check), there’s nothing wrong with going second-hand. I got a waffle iron for $5 from a charity store. That was 3 years ago and I’m still enjoying tasty waffles today!

I hope you enjoyed this and hopefully learned something new. Look out for my next article where I will discuss shopping on a budget.

Cameron, 22, just finished his BA in English Language and Literature at King’s College London. He is a poet, part of the Barbican Young Poets and Burn After Reading collective, as well as an academic mentor. You can read all of Cameron’s posts here

Good post. Really well thought it.

10:05 pm
"How amazing it is to find someone who wants to hear about all the things that go on in your head."

Nina LaCour, Hold Still (via poetrist)

Very

(via distracted-by-the-stars)

July 27, 2014 2:43 pm

steampoweredcupcake:

That just made my day.
I can’t wait to have someone that excited to see me.

(Source: 25th03, via distracted-by-the-stars)

2:40 pm 2:40 pm

jaclcfrost:

if you ever ask me to go to the movies there’s a 99.99999% chance i’ll say yes

even if i don’t want to see the movie

even if i’ve never heard of the movie

even if i’ve seen the movie before

no matter what i’ll most likely always say yes because i love the movies

(Source: jaclcfrost, via distracted-by-the-stars)

2:39 pm
brianmichaelbendis:

Dorothy : The Yellow Brick Road by skottieyoung

brianmichaelbendis:

Dorothy : The Yellow Brick Road by skottieyoung

(Source: browsethestacks)

July 26, 2014 6:28 pm 6:28 pm
batmananimated:

Can’t wait to see the teaser! Ben Affleck looks awesome in TDKR-style armor-suit

batmananimated:

Can’t wait to see the teaser! Ben Affleck looks awesome in TDKR-style armor-suit

(via dcu)